Linux File Integration Is Coming To Windows 10 File Explorer

Recently, Microsoft announced its plans for shipping a complete Linux kernel in Windows 10, and now the company is preparing to completely incorporate Linux File Integration into the Windows File Explorer.

This function would be incredibly useful to those using the Windows Subsystem on Windows 10 for Linux. For example, running a Bash shell and other Linux utilities in an Ubuntu environment is a simple way to do so.

As officials of Microsoft note in today’s blog post about the update, users have had the ability to access Linux files since Windows 10 1903, but the introduction today simplifies how users search to get them.

The icon that is to appear in File Explorer is the popular Tux, the Linux kernel penguin mascot. Microsoft is testing the integration of the Linux File Explorer into a new Windows 10 build which is now available for testers.

Previously, Windows 10 users will have to navigate manually to a UNC route to get access to Linux files from the Windows Linux Subsystem (WSL).

Users will see all of their Linux distros by clicking the Linux icon, and clicking those will position users directly for a specific distro in the Linux root file system.

Users will see all of their Linux distros by clicking the Linux icon, and clicking those will position users directly for a specific distro in the Linux root file system.

Unless you have WSL enabled, the Tux will appear in File Explorer, and Microsoft is now looking for integration input until it is completed as part of a potential upgrade to Windows 10. The software developer is releasing this update later this year to all Windows 10 customers.

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