SSL Offloading

SSL offloading eases a Web server of the processing burden of encrypting and/or decrypting traffic sent by means of SSL, the security protocol that is executed in every Web browser. Web clients today are considerably more ready about web security than only a couple of years prior; secured movement, trade by means of scrambled http activity is turning into the standard now for sites and applications.

Encrypting and decrypting network traffic are a very CPU-intensive task for servers. The initial session setup in particular, demands the most of a CPU. The general purpose CPUs of server hardware will take a significant hit when a website migrates towards 2048-bit or higher SSL keys.

When upgrading from 1024-bit to 2048-bit keys, the CPU usage typically increases 4–7 times. For 4096-bit keys, server CPUs are bound to reach their limits at typical volumes. The industry is quickly upgrading to 2048-bit keys; the minimum key length changed from 1024 to 2048-bit. Certificate Authorities (CAs) no longer provide certificates with key lengths smaller than 2048-bit.

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SSL offloading eases a Web server of the processing burden of encrypting and/or decrypting traffic sent by means of SSL. SSL offloading takes all the handling of SSL encryption and decoding of the primary Web server and moves it to a separate device designed specifically for the task. This permits the execution of the principle Web server to increase and it handles the SSL certificate proficiently.

SSL offloading increases the effectiveness of the security offered by the certificates because the designated device can devote more processing time to warding off attacks. It increases the Website and application speed and prevents companies from needing to add more Web servers to keep up with the demands of a frequently used SSL certificate.

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